SeaShell News: True Tulip & Banded Tulip, Cayo Costa Island

True Tulip & Banded Tulip, 2-28-15, Cayo Costa Island, SeaShell News & Shelling.
True Tulip & Banded Tulip, 2-28-15, Cayo Costa Island, SeaShell News & Shelling.

SeaShell News, 2-28-15, True Tulip & Banded Tulip, Shelling, Cayo Costa Island.

A nice True Tulip and a Banded Tulip from shelling on Cayo Costa Island.

“The tulip shell has a fusiform outline, with an overall smooth surface, and presents fine growth lines, and small denticles on the inner edge of its delicate outer lip.[2] It is whitish to tan in color, with rows of darker brownish blotches of various sizes. Over the blotches are symmetrical rows of thin lines which spiral along the whorls of the shell, which are normally about 9[2] in number.

The shell of an adult tulip snail can be from 2.5” to 9.5” inches (6.4 – 24.1 cm) in length.”  Source:  True Tulip.

“The banded tulip shell does not grow as large as that of the true tulip, Fasciolaria tulipa. Also the color pattern is different: the color splotches appear as a redder color (blue in rare areas) and the stripes that give the banded tulip its name are much farther apart.

The shell grows to be 2 ¼ – 4 1/8 inches (5.7-10.5 cm) in length.”  Source:  Banded Tulip.

SeaShell News: King’s Crown, Captiva Island

King's Crown, 2-28-15, Sanibel Island, SeaShell News & Shelling.
King’s Crown, 2-28-15, Sanibel Island, SeaShell News & Shelling.

SeaShell News, 2-28-15, King’s Crown, Shelling, Captiva Island.

Beautiful King’s Crown seashells from Sanibel & Captiva.

“Melongena corona Usually found among the mangroves and oyster beds. Up to 4″ in size.

Tends to be more of a bay shell because of its habitat. This is not usually a shell to be found along the beach unless you are near a pass of other area where oyster bars and mangroves are near.

Color form and spine structure can vary greatly from one area to the next.”  Source:  King’s Crown.

SeaShell News: Albino Scotch Bonnet, Sanibel Island

Albino Bonnet Seashell, 2-27-15, Sanibel Island, SeaShell News & Shelling.
Albino Bonnet Seashell, 2-27-15, Sanibel Island, SeaShell News & Shelling.

SeaShell News, 2-27-15, Albino Scotch Bonnet, Sanibel Island.

Rough water and wind has made the shelling superb the last couple of days.

“The Scotch bonnet (Semicassis granulata), also known as the ridged bonnet, is a medium-sized species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the subfamily Cassinae.[13][14] The common name alludes to the general outline and color of the shell, which vaguely resemble a Tam o’ Shanter, a traditional Scottish bonnet.

This species is found primarily in the tropical and subtropical Western Atlantic Ocean, from North Carolina to Uruguay.[12] It is the most common species in this subfamily in North America. A similar-appearing sea snail in the Mediterranean SeaSemicassis granulata undulata, has been considered a subspecies. These sea snails are predators; they search for their food on sandy stretches of the ocean floor, where they consume echinoderms such as sand dollars, sea biscuits, and other sea urchins.[15]

In 1965, the shell of this species was named a state symbol of North Carolina, making this the first state to designate an official state shell.”  Source:  Scotch Bonnet.